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Mad Cow Disease, lies and cats

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Feb. 24th, 2004 | 03:26 pm

Mad cow not a downer, which is important because the USDA only plans on testing downers for mad cow and they keep claiming that since the cow was a downer their testing program will keep meat eaters safe. There is now quite a bit of evidence pointing out that the cow wasn't a downer and that they knew it. (See for instance, several articles on soyjoy.blogspot.com)

I wonder what motivated the USDA to lie? Could it be to protect the profit margins of the businesses that several of the high ranking officials came from?

Also "mad cat" disease, during Britain's mad cow scare, it "was determined that more than 100 cats had died -- from feline spongiform encephalopathy."

The pet food industry in the US is unregulated and uses all the things that are considered "unsafe" for human consumption such as "the meat of animals that are sick or injured as well as the brains, spinal cords and intestines from older cows". All the things that are considered most infectious.

My cat has adapted well to her vegan cat food, considering I was already only feeding her kibble, switching to a different kind of kibble wasn't too difficult and she hasn't expressed any serious signs of displeasure. For those feeding canned cat food, the vegans also have fake meat cat food.

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Comments {10}

Circumambulate

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from: circumambulate
date: Feb. 24th, 2004 04:11 pm (UTC)
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Just wandered by on friends-of-friends list, but you're probably not doing your cat any favors. Unlike dogs, who are true omnivores, and can switch to a vegie diet, cats are true carnivores - they don't eat plant matter, and dietetically don't know what to do with it. Not all protein is created equal. Lots of information available, <ahref="http://www.felinefuture.com/nutrition/"target="new">here</a>. I've fed my cats the raw diet from that site, for several years, and they're healthier than they've ever been - both lost weight, and one had an asthma condition that entirely disappeared after getting grains out of her diet.

I'm not trying to be preachy - what you feed your pet is up to you - I'm just passing along information.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Feb. 24th, 2004 04:23 pm (UTC)
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vegancats.com faq, there's a couple of issues that make vegan cat food more challenging. One of the biggest is taurine, however someone figured out how to make synthetic taurine in 1930. One interesting issues is that commercial cat food doesn't include enough of the body parts that are rich in taurine so they also have to add synthetic taurine.

Though after a few months of being on the vegan cat food diet I was planning on taking her to the vet for a full blood chemistry workup.

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Usqueba

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from: usqueba
date: Feb. 24th, 2004 10:09 pm (UTC)
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The pet food industry in the US is unregulated and uses all the things that are considered "unsafe" for human consumption such as "the meat of animals that are sick or injured as well as the brains, spinal cords and intestines from older cows"

My cat doesn't eat beef (I originally typed "beer" - he doesn't eat beer either). He's allergic to it. He eats a special human-grade meat diet. Poor little welty cat.

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Clare T. Rampling

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from: rampling
date: Feb. 24th, 2004 10:16 pm (UTC)
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Wow, I'm impressed that your kitty is eating the vegan kibble. If she indeed has no problems with it, I must say I don't have a serious problem with it. Still, I wouldn't do that to my kitty -- I just feel that giving meat to carnivores is part of the "quality of life" for a cat.

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Usqueba

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from: usqueba
date: Feb. 24th, 2004 11:51 pm (UTC)
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"quality of life"

Not to mention his happy little face when you share your meat-food with him.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Feb. 26th, 2004 12:18 am (UTC)
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Well there's some quality of life for me, in that her breath and urine isn't as stinky. so i'm more willing accept kitty kisses.

Also without meat she's less likely to be exposed to all the various food born illnesses currently going around.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Feb. 26th, 2004 12:16 am (UTC)
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Yeah, but feeding her meat is rather bad for the quality of life of the chicken. And considering the reports of a parrot with a vocabulary of 950 words or the crow who fashioned a tool, it seems like there are many species which could easily be more intellegent than cats.

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Clare T. Rampling

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from: rampling
date: Feb. 26th, 2004 07:27 am (UTC)
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Cats are "bad for the quality of life" for many prey species. Including smaller birds. A cat would make a fine lunch of a damaged crow, easily. Nature is that way. No amount of hand wringing is going to save prey animals, no matter how intelligent you might think they are. Let them lose attention for a moment, get unlucky, be too young, get old or damaged, and they'll be gobbled up by another animal, perhaps a cat. That's the way of nature. It's not pretty, it's not nice. But you can't change that. Changing what humans do is one thing -- work on whatever campaigns you like. But you will never make more than token efforts to save prey from cats. Making those sorts of arguments about preditors seems to me to lead off into nonsense.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Feb. 27th, 2004 12:28 am (UTC)
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Though in nature the everything is prey for someone, top predators eat other top predators. Also the animal being preyed upon does have a chance to escape or fight for its life, which removes the weakest and overall strengthens the species.

However in the case of the factory farm, the animals being killed have no chance of escape, the only way to avoid their fate is to die earlier.

This seems to me to be more brutal than the natural world. (Or at least more hopeless).

There's a wide number of ways that my cat is outside nature. She receives immunizations, she has a steady supply of food that would allow her to survive a population crash in animals she might eat. Not to mention I keep her inside to prevent her from being participating in either side of of the food chain.

Also every species is always learning and changing, both genetically and individually. Considering domestic cats actually have to be taught to eat things that they kill is it truly natural for them to want to eat other creatures?

Also I find it interesting you're making an argument that something is superior because it's "natural".

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Clare T. Rampling

(no subject)

from: rampling
date: Feb. 27th, 2004 01:34 am (UTC)
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the animal being preyed upon does have a chance to escape or fight for its life

Baby animals do not have this chance. Nature is quite heartless in this regard.

And the way cats hunt, they often pounce and capture and kill their prey before the prey animal has a shred of a clue that the cat is coming. So much for having a chance.

Considering domestic cats actually have to be taught to eat things that they kill is it truly natural for them to want to eat other creatures?

I too would have to be taught to capture and kill animals in the wild. But I still like meat, and want it to be part of my diet. A cat, being a carnivore, is evolved to subsist almost entirely on meat. Hence whether or not a cat could actually kill a prey animal is irrelevant to whether or not that cat would prefer meat in its diet, or whether it's healthy for the cat.

Also I find it interesting you're making an argument that something is superior because it's "natural".

No, I wouldn't make that "natural" argument -- it's full of fallacies. Actually, you are the one making the "natural" argument (the previous quote I highlighted above).

As I said, I see the meat thing as primarily a "quality of life" issue, and somewhat (to a lesser extent) as a health issue. I like meat. I surmise that my kitty likes meat even more than I do, and she shows it by her enthusiasm for bits of real meat I give her occasionally. My quality of life would suffer if I was restricted from eating stuff I like, like cheese or meat. And I feel the same way about my kitty, that her quality of life would suffer too if she was deprived of these things she enjoys so much. Given the enthusiasm she shows for meat and cheese and milk, I don't want to eliminate those things from her diet. And since she was evolved to eat a meat diet, I believe that (in general) meat is rather appropriate for her. I need to moderate the amount of "treat" bits I give her, but I prefer that her food be meat-based so that it's closer to the food she was evolved to eat, and that she enjoys.

If you put out a bowl of high-quality meat-based cat food and a bowl of vegan stuff, which does your kitty prefer? I'm lucky that my kitty prefers the Science Diet Light (diet cat food) that I feed her, and chose it over the (non-diet) Deli Cat kibble I got her from the grocery store. So I don't feel sorry for her that she's getting diet kitty food -- she loves it and chose it!

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