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Jul. 8th, 2002 | 08:55 pm

So I got my new bike and have been fiddling with it trying to get things working... Unfortunately my confidence is better than my actual skills.

I keep repeating to myself the only way to learn is to make mistakes. Well it's not the only way, but it can work. And skills even if well-taught still require practice before you're good at them.

So I've tried truing the wheel, which partially worked, except I punctured an inner tube with the end of the spoke. So I needed to add some cloth tape to in wheel rim to fix that. Then the next inner tube developed a hole elsewhere.

So I patched both tubes and put one of the back in. Unfortunately I put it in with air still in the tube, so the tire wasn't able to seat itself in the rim properly. So, shortly after pumping it up to 100 psi, the tube had a blow-out. (About 4 meters from the back of my head, that was really loud.)

So take it apart again and put the other tube back in more carefully this time to hopefully avoid the blow-out problem.

Along the way I ran across comments that if you round the nipples of the spokes you need to replace them. While learning to true the wheel, I wasn't using quite the right tool and so dented the edges, so I should probably replace them.

*sigh*

So I have learned more about bicycle maintenance, I just wish I felt like I was actually competent instead of being a hopefully talented amateur.

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Comments {5}

Freya

Quick note

from: moonglade
date: Jul. 9th, 2002 04:43 am (UTC)
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I don't think you are supposed to true the wheel with the inner tube and tyre actually on the wheel!

Certainly I don't remember anyone doing that when I used to go to Friends of the Earth in Birmingham!

You can then check nothing is sticky out before putting the tube back on.

Hope that helps.

Would have hoped the wheel was in true when it arrived!

love

Freya

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Diane Trout

Re: Quick note

from: alienghic
date: Jul. 9th, 2002 09:22 am (UTC)
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The bike was mailed in a cardboard box though well packed, I think that it could've taken a serious whack while in transit (which is why I'm being a bit forgiving about the untrue wheel.)

After I read the instructions a little more thoroughly and learned that one should take the tyre & inner tube off. However I also learned that after I but them back on the wheel and inflated it, the wheel changed shape a little and started rubbing the break pads again.

Now I'm thinking that an inexpensive wheel truing stand might be nice... (But I own too much stuff... but it'd be useful... but it's more stuff... *sigh*)

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wig

Ooh scary!

from: wig
date: Jul. 9th, 2002 08:00 am (UTC)
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You are truing the wheels! I always thought that was supposed to be one of the hardest tasks of cycle maintenance. Wow, I'm impressed.

My cycle maintenance skills are limited to: fixing punctures, occasionally cleaning the damn thing, mal-adjusting my gear indexing, and changing the brake blocks so that they squeal properly. :-P

I wonder what kind of bike you have?

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Diane Trout

Re: Ooh scary!

from: alienghic
date: Jul. 9th, 2002 09:29 am (UTC)
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Truing the wheel just requires patience, it's not that hard. Especially if you have the right tools. (Of course I might be missing something still and will discover that getting it right is harder than I currently think).

I don't know, replacing the chain or rebuilding the freewheel seems more frightening to me right now. (Or is that leaving bike maintenance and entering bike repair?) Actually, I'm also wondering what is a good lubricant for things like the freewheel, seatpost, stem, or other things that aren't the chain.

I have a bike friday New World Tourist.

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wig

A folding bike!

from: wig
date: Jul. 9th, 2002 11:31 pm (UTC)
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I tried out a few folding bikes one day and found it difficult to get used to the small wheels. Still, some day I would like one. Some day I will have a bike for every occasion... even though it seems extravagant, when you compare it to the cost of owning a single car you see that it is actually a reasonable idea!

I wouldn't actually know about truing the wheel, I was just scared off by rumours. Heh replacing the chain or rebuilding the freewheel, that is definitely straying into bike repair.

I'm not sure about lubes off the top of my head, I always have to check my bike maintenance book coz they do recommend different lubes for different areas and some things (like seat post) seem to be lubed so infrequently that I forget in between servicing. So, sorry I can't help with this.

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