?

Log in

No account? Create an account

State of the World 2002

« previous entry | next entry »
Mar. 14th, 2002 | 01:16 am
mood: Angry

I've been reading the State of the World 2002 by the Worldwatch institute. Chapter 7 has pissed me off.

It's on "Breaking the link between resources and repression".

There's a good number of wars going on right now that are more about exploiting resources than trying to become a government. In some places the various factions actually end up selling weapons to each other, while grabbing the local population and forcing the boys to commit atrocities against their own relatives, and raping the girls.

Some of the top resources paying for these conflicts include oil, diamonds, gold, copper, coltan (an ore rich in tantalite, an material crucial for current state-of-the art capacitors), timber, and ivory.

So I knew that as far as I can tell pretty much every oil company in existence has been linked to human right abuses by supporting local military forces' repression of anyone protesting the companies behavior. Unfortunately I wasn't aware of the high-tech connection to these practices (other than exploiting women labor to assemble the circuit boards).

I wonder how much progress the team trying to print micro-circuitry with nanotube ink and an ink-jet printer have been making.

It'd be nice to have an sustainable alternatives for the bits of high-tech society I like, so I can get back to picking on U.S. oil dependence.

Link | Leave a comment | Share

Comments {8}

Clare T. Rampling

(no subject)

from: rampling
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 02:38 am (UTC)
Link

It seems like way too many industries have very dirty secrets that a vast majority of us don't know about. Oil/gas, clothing, and now chocolate. I just found out about chocolate slaves last night (on Dateline NBC). Interestingly enough, those close to the problem apparently don't recommend boycotts -- they're afraid that that would make prices plummet, which would only tend to increase the desire for more unpaid slaves.

At least, according to this website, There has been much media attention and lobbying on the Hill over the past few weeks about child slaves in the cocoa fields in Ivory Coast, Africa. I hope this attention will begin to bring about useful reform.

Reply | Thread

Robin

(no subject)

from: solri
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 05:07 am (UTC)
Link

Damn, and I'd just seen that link on the worldwatch page that said "Eat chocolate and save the rainforest." That's the kind of eco-activism I could really have got into!

Reply | Parent | Thread

Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 11:19 am (UTC)
Link

It seems like way too many industries have very dirty secrets that a vast majority of us don't know about.

I've know about quite a few of these abuses for some time, it's one reason I get so twitchy and willing to boycott close to any corporation bigger than about 100 employees who've got the slightest whiff of wrong doing. There's a good chance that they probably are guility of something, since the current economic system seems set up to reward those who engage in exploitive practices.

Though as an alternative to boycotting, chocolate might be another good resource for the fair trade certification program that's been making progress for coffee growers.

Also action by political groups might be a bit more effective with chocolate than say oil, since I doubt the chocolate manufacturers have lobbies anywhere near as strong as the oil industry.

Reply | Parent | Thread

(Deleted comment)

[you'll find a light, find a friend, find a way]

(no subject)

from: artemii
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 09:06 am (UTC)
Link

cisco is also one of many many american-based companies that pays literally no taxes.

Reply | Parent | Thread

(Deleted comment)

[you'll find a light, find a friend, find a way]

(no subject)

from: artemii
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 10:58 am (UTC)
Link

i read an entire article about this over a year ago but i would have no idea where to locate it now.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 11:10 am (UTC)
Link

No, the chapter is actually pretty narrowly focused.</p>
This chapter is concerned with natural resources extracted through mining and logging activities, but other resource-related conflicts are also taking place around the world. Many local and regional disputes revolve around equitable access to arable land and water, although these resources are not easily traded and therefore do not lend themselves to financing hostilities. Due to space constraints, the chapter also does not address conflicts arising out of the depletion of resources and degradation of natural systems. [State of the world 2002, pg 151-152]
</p>Though in some cases only one side is being paid by the resource extraction, for instance shell paying the nigerian regime for security services against the movement for the survival of the ogoni's mass protests.

Reply | Parent | Thread

[you'll find a light, find a friend, find a way]

Diamonds and African Civil Wars

from: artemii
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 09:07 am (UTC)
Link

"De Beers: We wipe the blood off before we give it to you"

Reply | Thread

Diane Trout

Re: Diamonds and African Civil Wars

from: alienghic
date: Mar. 14th, 2002 11:21 am (UTC)
Link

That's the kind of slogan that might be effective when stuck to diamond ads. It's funny in a really disturbing kind of way, which might be good at getting people to think about what they're doing.

Reply | Parent | Thread