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Eliminate credit card ads.

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Feb. 21st, 2002 | 11:02 pm
mood: Ecstatic

So I was looking at the center for a new american dream's web site. And they started an interesting program called turn the tide. It's a set of 9 moderatly simple things to do that will improve the environment.

One of the steps is "independence from junk mail."

This includes a phone number (800-353-0809) to call to have one's name removed permanently from the credit card marketing lists. Admittedly it prompts for your social security number, but I found an additional reference to the same number on a page at the california DMV.

Also while going through my pile of mail, there was also a flyer for a "Do not call" list being offered to block unsolicited telemarketing calls in california. More information is available on this page. Unfortunatly it's going to go live January 2003.

Also if you want to sign up and so I can get credit for convincing more people to join, my email address is "diane" at the domain "ghic.org" (which should be in the format user@dom.ain)

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Comments {5}

Robin

(no subject)

from: solri
date: Feb. 22nd, 2002 02:58 am (UTC)
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I love the irony - unsolicited mail advertising protection from unsolicited phone calls. Still, I'd rather have the former than the latter any day, so I suppose it makes a kind of sense.

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Feb. 22nd, 2002 10:52 pm (UTC)
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It took me a moment to connect the unsolicted mail with the flyer and see the irony you were pointing out. But now that I can see, yes it is rather ironic. Not to mention that to get rid of the mail takes a phone call.

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Jon

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from: oddhack
date: Feb. 22nd, 2002 03:48 pm (UTC)
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Junkbusters describes an interesting tactic for getting off junk mail lists: reporting it to the USPS as unsolicited porn, whereupon they are suppose to require the mailer to stop sending anything to you. The tricky part is that the definition of "porn" is supposedly entirely up to the recipient thereof.

After receiving 3 AT&T Broadband spams/week for the last N months, and having them ignore my phone request to be removed from all their mailing lists, I'm about to try this technique out.

Of course, even if they stop sending it, that doesn't mean you'll stop getting it - e.g. I've been trying for the last 4.5 years to get USPS to stop delivering unaddressed "Penny Savers" and the like. The mailers were happy to take me off their mailing list, but the delivery person keeps stuffing them in my box sans address cards. No amount of complaints to USPS has produced more than temporary relief.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Feb. 22nd, 2002 10:56 pm (UTC)
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It almost seems that to get rid of the unadressed stuff would require standing next to your mailbox and applying positive and negative reinforcement techniques whenever the mail carrier was delivering your mail.

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Jon

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from: oddhack
date: Feb. 22nd, 2002 11:23 pm (UTC)
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Alas, using "negative reinforcement" on a mailperson would probably be construed as a felony - federal employees get protections not extended to the rest of us. They are also not, IME, particularly clueful and/or honest. I have had USPS employees deny, repeatedly, to my face, that they had any kind of supervisor, reporting chain, or person they were responsible to. They've also denied having telephones accessible from the public network in post offices.

After complaints to the local consumer affairs columnist (SJ Mercury "Action Line"), I amazingly enough was called directly by the local postmaster, who promised to put an end to this and gave me his direct phone number. 3 weeks and crossing fingers, now - apparently USPS could not care less about any number of formal complaints filed through the proper channels, but being embarassed in the newspaper produces effects.

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