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Sharing some doom

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Mar. 13th, 2009 | 08:31 am

Been I while since I tormented you all with a global warming post

Copenhagen summit urges immediate action on climate change, it contains some choice quotes.
The latest results made for bleak listening at times. Scientists cautioned that some of the impacts of global warming, such as sea level rise and loss of summer sea ice in the Arctic, are happening much sooner and more severely than scientists had estimated just two years ago

That' whole "Climate change is going to happen in 30 years in the future"? That was said 30 years ago, we're crashing right now.
“I'm frustrated that 30 years after the US National Academies of Science issued a strong warning on CO2 warming, the full urgency of this problem hasn't dawned on politicians and the general public.”

Stefan Rahmstorf
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

And if you don't want to believe pansy-ass scientists, how about insurance companies?

Under discussion were data compiled by Munich Re, whose NatCatservice database, comprising 22,000 natural disasters dating back to AD79 is the largest of its kind. NatCat service shows that the frequency of weather related catastrophes have increased sixfold since the 1950s. The number of non-weather disasters, such as earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions, has only marginally increased during the same period

(Nature, Vol 441 8, June 2006 pg 674)

In a paper published this week in Environmental Research Letters1, Lowe and colleagues concluded that if emissions peak by 2015 and are decreased 3% per year thereafter, there is a 55% chance of exceeding a 2°C rise in global average temperatures, and a 1 in 3 chance that the world will still be more than 2°C warmer in 100 years' time.
from Nature News 12 March 2009 | Nature | doi:10.1038/news.2009.165

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Comments {6}

Bolowolf

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from: bolowolf
date: Mar. 13th, 2009 04:53 pm (UTC)
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We're doomed.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Mar. 13th, 2009 05:27 pm (UTC)
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That's my typical conclusion.

Though from space.alglobus.net, Biosphere 2 was able to support 8 people for two years in a (almost) materially closed system, although many problems were encountered. Such closed systems are essential for space colonization.

So we can currently build an almost closed ecosystem, which could also be used to live in a collapsed earth ecosystem.

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Bolowolf

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from: bolowolf
date: Mar. 13th, 2009 06:32 pm (UTC)
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How long before we can change that 8 to bigger numbers like thousands or millions? Will we be able to cover everyone, or won't it matter because so many will have died already?

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Mar. 13th, 2009 07:23 pm (UTC)
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um... I was thinking more of 1) saving myself and people close to me, 2) providing the idea so others can save themselves, and 3) preventing total human extinction.

about 70,000 years ago humanity almost went extinct and dropped down to about 2,000 people, so that's my target threshold for one of these "life boats". Ideally many of them would be constructed. Also they'd be good experiments for learning about ecosystem management.

I guess I'm currently thinking, humanity is probably mostly screwed, so you might as well save yourself, but then try not to make things worse in case we do get our act together.

I also want to read "Getting Green Done" for some ideas of actually trying to build in some level of sustainability.

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Bolowolf

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from: bolowolf
date: Mar. 13th, 2009 08:06 pm (UTC)
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I guess unless somebody loves me an awful lot, or I change career paths to earn more income, a biosphere is out of reach for me.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Mar. 13th, 2009 08:57 pm (UTC)
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I think it'd be difficult for an individual or family to do, i suspect some kind of intentional community might be the smallest group that has a chance.

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