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Linux Filesystems

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May. 29th, 2007 | 03:53 pm

I was trying to copy a large directory tree off a full 500 GB NTFS drive to a 500 GB ext3 linux drive, and I ran out of space. (thus losing some data). So I decided I should see how much free space different linux filesystems have after copying over 236,795 files averaging about 1.236 MiB.

I wonder if that 30 GB that ext2/3 are missing have something to do with that 5% they try to reserve for the system administrator, or if xfs is just that much more efficient.
Filesystemfree before copy (Kbytes)free after copy (Kbytes)
jfs488 276 324189 216 372
xfs488 252 384189 261 220
reiserfs488 336 248189 090 118
ext3456 097 056156 222 476
ext2456 228 264156 357 236
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Comments {5}

REM

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from: remmer
date: May. 30th, 2007 05:26 am (UTC)
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Part of it is probably minfree. Additionally, though, ext2/3 pre-allocate i-nodes at filesystem creation time whereas the others allocate i-nodes dynamically.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: May. 30th, 2007 05:49 am (UTC)
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Ah!

That makes a lot of sense. Thank you.

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Dilinger

i Nodes

from: dilinger
date: May. 30th, 2007 02:15 pm (UTC)
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What is an i-node.

FYI:
You could have made a 3rd column with the differnece. It's too early to do the math.

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Diane Trout

Re: i Nodes

from: alienghic
date: May. 30th, 2007 05:30 pm (UTC)
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An "i-node" is an "information node" that stores information about a file on unix filesystems. wikipedia i-node entry

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Dilinger

Re: i Nodes

from: dilinger
date: Jun. 1st, 2007 05:43 pm (UTC)
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Ahh

"I'm Not Operating DOS Ever".

I miss 4dos. :)All the pretty colors!

Just like the wiki says, it doesn't sound very intuitive.

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