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Firefox patch progress

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Sep. 24th, 2006 | 02:12 am

I finished my patch for firefox that enables reading system proxy settings from the OS X system configuration. I packaged it up and submitted it. And then I had the clever idea of applying the patch to a pristine tree and re-building.

Of course once I did that, I remembered that I forgot to include a file.

So then I decided to stop being lazy, checked out a new clean copy of mozilla and reapplied the patch to both OS X and Linux and started building. I then found a couple of places I forgot to make some updates in the Linux version, which meant start all over again with patching the pristine trees.

I hope this current version works.

I also wish that it wasn't so hard to get a distcc set up to build multiple platforms. (distcc is a tool to allow you to use multiple computers to compile your programs) and that I had enough machines laying around to get some short compile times.

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from: aerynvale
date: Sep. 24th, 2006 05:18 pm (UTC)
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Reminds me of the saying that there is no bug-free software. As in, no one ever writes it perfect the first time. I was a programmer once and I hear they made jokes about my code long after I was gone. c.c

Oh, something I've been working with lately are virtual machines. Don't know if you've messed with these, but they can be pretty handy. Both the VMWare and Microsoft versions are free now, but they tend to be slow, performance-wise. There's a package called Parallels we've been working with that's much faster, but you have to pay for it. $50 for the Windows client and $80 for the Mac version. Still, not a bad price for what it does. Anyway, just thought that might be useful to you for testing in different environments.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Sep. 24th, 2006 11:55 pm (UTC)
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Yeah I've used VMware, it was an ok way to run some windows software before wine got good enough to run simpler windows program.

I've had a low priority thread looking at Xen, it looks like a neat idea, and the cross machine VM migration feature is pretty cool.

What I thought would be a really impressive project would be to convert the darwin kernel and ReactOS to be xen compatible. (ReactOS is an open source implementation of windows NT/2k/xp).

OS X, Linux, and Windows on one machine running at the same time. Here's to those new quad core CPUs.

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Lauren

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from: hardrockgrrl
date: Sep. 24th, 2006 11:16 pm (UTC)
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I used to wonder who were these magnanimous open-source programmers who spent countless hours fixing bugs and distributing patches so the rest of us would never have to even pretend to know what a kernel is. And now I know.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Sep. 24th, 2006 11:57 pm (UTC)
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Yeah the basic way it works is if you're a programmer and something bugs you in some open source program, you go fix it and share it. (Not to mention there's also a bit of ego boost that can go along with it.)

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