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Katrina

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Sep. 1st, 2005 | 10:17 pm
mood: pessimisticpessimistic

I've been watching the news about Katrina, and its effects on gasoline prices, and have been struggling to maintain some sense of safety.

I live with a strong sense that at any moment the world could suddenly break, and then I went and filled it up with stories about global warming, peak oil, aquifer depletion, etc. Needless to say its very easy for me to start think that the world is about to end. I found Did God send the Hurricane mildly reassuring as the writer pointed out how many raised with apocalyptic christianity just change stories but still maintain the same dread of the future.

I can tell others are shocked by this even too, I'm not really shocked, I'm more terrified about similar things happening more frequently, or perhaps that Katrina will topple the US economy or a whole host of other things that my mind is more than happy to torment me with.

I need some way to live with out this constant anxiety. At this point my first reaction isn't to help the victims of Katrina, its instead to make sure that my disaster kit is complete. I don't want it scattered around my house, it needs to be in some backpack or saddlebag thing so I can evacuate in a couple of moments.

Its hard to tell whats reasonable and what is just insecurity clawing at me, currently I'm trying to convince myself that the FEMA disaster preparedness handbook is reasonable.

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Comments {9}

Josh

(no subject)

from: irilyth
date: Sep. 2nd, 2005 05:41 am (UTC)
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Nature is so much stronger than we are.

But we are so much stronger than that.

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Bolowolf

(no subject)

from: bolowolf
date: Sep. 2nd, 2005 01:31 pm (UTC)
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Sticking with the FEMA or Red Cross disaster preparedness info. is reasonable. They're good guides and you already have a sense of what your needs are. Having stuff together is definitely helpful.

Out of curiosity, how much is gas by you? It's about $3.19 in this area of NY.

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Sep. 2nd, 2005 04:21 pm (UTC)
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So I'm not being to crazy by wanting to add a large capcity backpack, sleeping bag, perhaps a tent, a couple of
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So I'm not being to crazy by wanting to add a large capcity backpack, sleeping bag, perhaps a tent, a couple of <a href"http://www.realgoods.com/shop/shop3.cfm/dp/303/ts/1037357">hand powered flashlights</a> and <a href="http://www.rei.com/category/4500615.htm?vcat=REI_SSHP_CAMPING_TOC">hand powered radio</a> to my emergency pack? I also want some spare parts for my bike including the front rack.

Then I start sliding into wanting a portable solar charger for my laptop, though that's expensive enough that'll probalby need to wait.

I currently have (spread throughout my apartment) a multiday REI first aid kit, a couple of 5 gallon jugs of water (though its time to rotate the water), water purification kit, iodine tablits, DEET insect repelant, camp stove, camp pot, 1 container of fuel for stove, matches, leatherman, a selection of canned and foil stored food, and a lot of vegan cat food in an air tight container.

I don't know, I rarely buy gas, even with unusual for me amounts of driving I still only fill up like once a month. (Yay bicycles).

However I bet <a href="http://losangelesgasprices.com">Los Angeles gas prices.com</a> part of <a href="http://gasbuddy.com">gasbuddy.com</a> has the data you're looking for. (And a whole lot more as they've got at least 3 years of historical data broken down by state or major metropolitan area.

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Nafees

(no subject)

from: nogbogfrog
date: Sep. 2nd, 2005 05:24 pm (UTC)
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So I grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, a city of about 300,000 people. We went through 2 mandatory evacuations from hurricanes. What is transpiring in New Orleans has made me realize that for all of South Carolina's faults, disaster preparedness is *NOT* one of them. Only now can I appreciate how much on the ball that state is every year. To them the recovery process starts before the hurricane hits. The national guards start getting deployed about 2 days before landfall. They bring in water purification units, and relief supplies. 1 day before landfall they make the decision on evacuation. The inbound lanes on the interstates are turned so people can travel out easier. Schools are turned into shelters. Sheriffs and police go door to door in the high risk areas to take people to shelters or have them sign a document that they are staying against advice.

In 1989 we had to evacuate, and Hurricane Hugo caused $10 billion in damage, and about 50 people died (falling trees, downed power lines, or just wrong place wrong time). In 1999 we had to evacuate, but thankfully the hurricane went north by 100 miles. State gov't didn't mess around in either case. In the 1999 case it ended up costing the state a lot of money, even though the hurricane didn't hit. But the plan gets set in motion if anything comes nearby. In the end it's only money.

The fault lies squarely on the shoulder of Louisiana state government.

-n

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Sep. 2nd, 2005 09:47 pm (UTC)
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Several of the essays I've read talked about the shocking and sudden collapse of the rule of law in new orleans, are reminding me that individuals don't survive disasters communities do.

Apocalypse Now: World Stunned as US struggles


There was even a CNN story about a sniper going after the hospital is just despicable.

Survival in chaos takes planning and teamwork, something america seems to be increasingly short of.

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Vicky the Compost Queen

I've been having a very strong hoarding complex

from: vixter
date: Sep. 2nd, 2005 11:51 pm (UTC)
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recently. I just bought a 5 gallon gas can. It's still empty, so it could still be used for water if necessary.

I just got a bike bag which has foldable panniers. It's a Topeak so it comes off the rack easily but won't fall off. I would have a pannier back all set up and ready to go. And another bag that you could attach with a bungie cord. Not that I do, though.


I'm more worried than ever. There is a yahoo groups called running on empty 2 that has lots of hints. Then there is
www.urbansurvival.com which has interesting stuff. I also subscribed to their companion site peoplenomics for $30 / year. I think it's worth it.

Anyway, about the oca and yacon. Next time you are in the bay area, come out and see them. If driving up and down California is still a doable thing.

Visualize impeachment.

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A

Katrina

from: descartes_rock
date: Sep. 4th, 2005 10:00 pm (UTC)
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Gas in Canada is between $1.25 a litre and $1.50. For you Yanks, that's about $5 to $6 a gallon. The one good thing that could come from this is at some point down the road I may not see all those super-sized SUVs on the road, carrying single drivers to and from their urban destinations.

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markcronan

Aw well, it is the end

from: markcronan
date: Sep. 16th, 2005 03:11 pm (UTC)
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http://news.independent.co.uk/world/science_technology/article312997.ece

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Diane Trout

Re: Aw well, it is the end

from: alienghic
date: Sep. 17th, 2005 07:42 am (UTC)
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Told you... now if we'd only get around to re-engineering our society to stop our industrial and population exponential growth we might not be completely wiped out...

No matter how efficient our technology becomes if we're still experiencing population or economic growth we'll still crash and burn. Pity the entire world economy is built on exponential growth.

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