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May. 12th, 2004 | 11:38 am

Huh, slashdot led me to a wired article Hybrid mileage comes up short. It appears that least for some drivers they're not getting millage much better than a similar sized gasoline car. The person complaining was only getting 31.4 mpg on his civic hybrid, considering I'm still getting about 30 mpg in my 12 year old mazda 323 this is pretty sad. Though perhaps I drive more efficiently than the driver of that hybrid. As an aside my best millage in my car was about 41 mpg, I'd made the drive from san jose to los angeles on a single tank of gas).

Sounds like if you want a truly high millage car, you'll have to wait for the volkswagen 1 liter car (per 100 km). Though there's also the lupo which gets about 100 km per liter. (Though efficient driving experts were able to get 2.78 liters per 100 km (101.6 mpg).

And if you ran it on biodiesel it might not even be that bad for the environment. (At the very least biodiesel is carbon neutral.)

Or you could just ride a bike and get the equivalent of 1200 mpg.

And if your in a city you're only traveling at half the average speed of a car. If you're in los angeles during rush hours you might even be travelling at the same speed as those cars.

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Comments {7}

Null pointer

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from: lawnchair
date: May. 12th, 2004 01:26 pm (UTC)
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I have yet to find a decent non-conspiratorial reason why the Lupo is unavailable, and according to some sources, impossible to license in the US.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: May. 12th, 2004 01:31 pm (UTC)
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Some of the arguments I've seen are: the lupo only runs on low sulfur diesel which is currently unavailable in the US, volkswagen thinks that americans wouldn't buy a compact car, and the california air resource board doesn't like diesel because they emit significantly more toxins than gas engines.

Though I do wonder if its possible to reach the crossover point where the diesel uses sufficently less fuel than a gasoline car to drop below the toxic emissions of the gas car.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: May. 12th, 2004 01:48 pm (UTC)
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Hmmm. I don't really know enough about this subject... A bit of looking turned up this diesel booster page which suggests that new technology is making diesel much cleaner than it was before. Though of course they didn't directly compare how a gas and diesel engine with equivalent amounts of low emissions technology did.

They did claim that both gas and diesel car engines would have to meet the same "tier 2" air quality standard when it went (or did go) into effect.

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(no subject)

from: ex_ex_tchar
date: May. 12th, 2004 03:43 pm (UTC)
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I always heard that, in general, diesel is much "greener" than gas.

And I previously owned both diesel and gasoline cars.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: May. 12th, 2004 03:51 pm (UTC)
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Could you tell a strong difference between the how dirty the exhaust from either car seemed?

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Nafees

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from: nogbogfrog
date: May. 12th, 2004 05:03 pm (UTC)
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It seems to be a well known secret amongst the hybrid owners I know that the EPA mileage tests are a whitewash. Funny, no?

-n

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Bolowolf

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from: bolowolf
date: May. 13th, 2004 09:08 am (UTC)
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I'll be curious to see if that holds true with the new Toyota Hybrids that store power from braking. The Prius allegedly gets 55 mpg.

My 97 Cavalier, while never the greatest car in the world, does seem to consistently outdo it's better-in-class counterparts (Corolla, Civic, etc) as I can get 40 mpg on the highway and around 33 or 34 in town.

My 2 cents.

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