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Vegetarianism

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Dec. 13th, 2003 | 12:57 pm
mood: curiouscurious

Another interesting detail I learned about the activist is that she's culturally jewish. This led me to an interesting observation. Does being kosher make it easier to later become vegetarian?

My parents wacky christian church followed at least some of the old testament food laws. Now not only am I vegetarian, pork and seafood make me physically ill. Most of other vegetarians that I know are at least culturally jewish, suggesting to me that growing up they probably were kosher.

Random fluke or real trend?

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Comments {14}

[you'll find a light, find a friend, find a way]

(no subject)

from: artemii
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 01:30 pm (UTC)
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i don't know, but as one vegetarian, i'm not culturally jewish.
my town was so non-jewish that the only jewish family i knew had to drive an hour to attend synagogue.
most other vegetarians i know are not jewish either, culturally or otherwise. maybe it's the cross-section of people you know in particular?

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 04:18 pm (UTC)
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Probably. One of the fun points the skeptic groups like to make is that humans like to find patterns in things. So with my 4 data points I decided to make a weird extrapolation.

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(no subject)

from: musicwomyn
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 02:08 pm (UTC)
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Well, I group up culturally Jewish, but not really Kosher (though we rarely ever ate pork). I have a Kosher Jewish friend who is primarily vegetarian, but only because it is easier as someone who keeps kosher.

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 04:18 pm (UTC)
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Did you occasionally eat pork? Growing up my parents followed the church line thinking that counted as sin.

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(no subject)

from: musicwomyn
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 04:32 pm (UTC)
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I personally can recall eating some bacon and canadian bacon on occassion. My mother also owned a pizza parlor for a few years and they used lard in the pizza dough, which I, too ate. We never had pork, generally, in the house (unless it happened to be an additive or something). I've never had a pork chop ever.

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Usqueba

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from: usqueba
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 04:06 pm (UTC)
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Does being kosher make it easier to later become vegetarian

A long while back, my friend who's an Orthodox Jew said that it might seem like eating kosher would make going vegetarian easier but it ain't so. It's not necessarily healthier than eating non-kosher, either.

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Usqueba

P.S.

from: usqueba
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 04:15 pm (UTC)
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Oh and I know several Jews who do NOT keep kosher in any way, shape or form. Pork, shellfish, cheeseburgers, the whole nine yards.

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Diane Trout

Re: P.S.

from: alienghic
date: Dec. 13th, 2003 04:24 pm (UTC)
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Hmm... I come from a family of fanatics, I'm not used to people ignoring their religions commandments. Though jewishness is odd in that is both a religion and a culture/ethnicity.

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her other side

(no subject)

from: saltbox
date: Dec. 14th, 2003 10:46 am (UTC)
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vegetarians I know and can think of offhand (* for vegan)

me not culturally Jewish
Il culturally Jewish
Mo culturally Jewish
D not culturally Jewish
Ja* not culturally Jewish
Ka* not culturally Jewish
Am* not culturally Jewish
Ja culturally Jewish
Wa not culturally Jewish
M not culturally Jewish
Mh* not culturally Jewish
Si not culturally Jewish
Ch not culturally Jewish
Lo not culturally Jewish
La not culturally Jewish
Pa not culturally Jewish
Pl not culturally Jewish
Da not culturally Jewish
An not culturally Jewish
To not culturally Jewish

Anyway, hmm, my sample group seems to be quite different in character from your sample group. And it's not like I don't have many Jewish friends, either! Just that they're mostly not vegetarian.

That being said, the Jewish friends I have who do keep kosher usually do eat vegetarian meals. But they don't identify as vegetarian, and do, on occasion, eat meat. But probably less than the average American.

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Dec. 14th, 2003 12:49 pm (UTC)
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Hmm... so the new question is do I have more jewish friend that one is typically likely to have.

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her other side

(no subject)

from: saltbox
date: Dec. 15th, 2003 06:38 am (UTC)
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Like I said, it's not like I don't have many Jewish friends, either! A pretty large number of my friends are Jewish (for close ones, I can think of at least ten right off the bat). Just that they're mostly not vegetarian.

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Nafees

(no subject)

from: nogbogfrog
date: Dec. 14th, 2003 06:09 pm (UTC)
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I am culturally muslim, and our dietary practices closely resemble kosher. The arabic word is "halal". I do not believe that going vegetarian is any easier, and going vegan is near impossible.

-n

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Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Dec. 14th, 2003 06:20 pm (UTC)
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Hmm... I've found being vegetarian to be pretty easy, and both because of weight loss and a cute girl am toying with going vegan.

Although part of it was because of a don't ask don't tell policy about some foods. I only recently learned for instance that rice might be cooked with chicken broth.

The closer I get to preparing all of my food the easier vegetarian diets seem.

Though enough about me I'm curious as to what are the dietary requirements of "halal" are?

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Hopita

(no subject)

from: hopita
date: Dec. 15th, 2003 06:09 pm (UTC)
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From Living A Jewish Life by Anita Diamant and Howard Cooper:

Some Jews give up meat altogether. In addition to the biblical and religious justifications for this practice, there are also political, ecological, and ethical rationales for Jewish vegetarianism as well. Given that meat is such a resource-intensive food and that so many other sources of high-quality protein are now available, a vegetarian lifestyle can be seen as a modern fulfillment of the goals of kashrut and of Judaism; living a holier life and helping to repair the world.

Vegetarianism simplifies kashrut because it does away with the need to find kosher meat and issues around mixing meat and dairy. Restaurant meals are dairy or pareve.

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