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Jun. 20th, 2001 | 03:27 pm

I feel rather behind at work...

Especially at the trying to understand what's going on, my math skills atrophied a while back and now I'm needing to understand relatively complex statistically based algorithms and modeling. It's a pity I can't remember calculus, diff eq, and linear algeba.

I really need to be reading a bunch of stuff, but I have no comfy place to curl up with a textbook and read. And I'm not even sure if I've got enough space for a comfy chair or couch in my apartment.

What kinds of places do other people like to read in?

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Comments {6}

Monument

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from: marnanel
date: Jun. 21st, 2001 04:09 am (UTC)
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Curled up on the floor, or curled up in a chair, are good places for reading.

I used to read in bed as a child, but recently it hasn't been too easy, just because it's not easy to get the book in such an angle that it's easy to read at the same time as not having to hold it in such a way that my arms ache. And I've never been able to read outside properly-- the sun or the wind or drizzle always messes it up. One summer I took a book out of the library at college onto the lawns to read it, and a tree dripped sticky tree stuff onto it.

I wish I read now as much as I used to :(

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Jun. 21st, 2001 12:20 pm (UTC)
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I remember fondly the days when I could polish off a novel in a day. Though I think that a large component of why that was because I would read during my high school classes.

For some reason they don't let me get away with that while at work.

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none

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from: m2
date: Jun. 21st, 2001 07:02 pm (UTC)
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I`ve been reading your journal this night and I must say that I share most of the things you write and I love the way you write them.

It`s always the same for those who choose to be what we want to be instead of what society tell us to be, no matter what we want to be.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Jun. 21st, 2001 11:39 pm (UTC)
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Thank you for your kind words I'm really glad that people actually enjoy reading my writing.

I like writing it too. :)

I did go looking at your journal as well and descovered it's in spanish (I think). I wish the american school system was actually competant at teaching multiple languages.

I hear that in other parts of the world children are tought their native language, english and usually another language as well.

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none

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from: m2
date: Jun. 22nd, 2001 03:28 pm (UTC)
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Yes, my journal is in spanish. I thought about writing it in english but if I do it then my entries would be so short, and I prefer to write everything I need even if only a few can read it.

And about school system, here in Spain we study english since we´re 8 years old, if I recall correctly. But as we do it with 40 or 45 pupils in each class we don´t learn so much.

I think that the EU is planning about teaching a third language at every european school in a future. That is a great advantage in the US because you only talk in english. Here we have , practically, a different language in each country.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Jun. 27th, 2001 06:35 pm (UTC)
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I might argue that it's better to be being taught several languages, than to just have one dominant language.

Different languages are better at expressing things. For example I've read that english speakers tend to think very binary. Things are either this or that, never something in between.

Other languages might be more forgiving of the idea of variation.

However if all you ever learn is just one language you don't necessarily learn this concept.

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