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Get me out of this country!

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Mar. 30th, 2003 | 07:51 pm

US soldiers in Iraq asked to pray for Bush.

Monday's [prayer] reads "Pray that the President and his advisers will be strong and courageous to do what is right regardless of critics".

I think I may be lashing out at christians these days instead of my previous self-imposed silence to promote civility.

I grew up in a fundamentalist christian cult, though I can't ever remember really believing in the existence of god. I remember thinking it was possible god existed at times and going along with it because that's what I was supposed to do. However I never shared these doubts with my family as they were all strong believers, and in the interest of not getting yelled at or otherwise punished I kept my doubts to myself.

In high school I shared the fact that christmas is a repackaged pagan festival with some friend at school. He ended up being quite offended, and I had to apologize for telling him this which bothered me. It seemed wrong to have to apologize for telling someone the truth (it's not like I was using a poor reference, it was described as pagan in the first few paragraphs of the encyclopedia britannica)

So I learned that people are strangely attached to their religion in a way that I find incomprehensible and that people would be less angry with me if I didn't challenge their belief systems.

However since we currently have a born again christian fanatic running america and his belief system allows him to invade other non-christian countries without any sense of guilt, I'm not in the mood to be so quiet.

Maybe sometime later I'll describe how I developed some neo-pagan overtones to my atheist philosophy.

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Comments {5}

Josh

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from: irilyth
date: Mar. 30th, 2003 11:00 pm (UTC)
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I don't want to get embroiled in arguments about politics, but one of the best things about our country is that we're free to hate our government, and to say how much we hate it, and to try to change it to something we like better. It's eminently possible to hate the government, but still love the country. (It's also possible to hate both, of course, but it's an important distinction anyway.)

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Mar. 31st, 2003 10:26 am (UTC)
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I think I'm just feeling grumpy at all the religious types wandering around. I'm somewhat configured to blame them for a number of my problems.

Although my other frustration with America is I'd really like to live in a car free district of a city, and I don't think such a thing exists in the US. (It does in other parts of the world though).

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Melody

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from: melodymuse
date: Mar. 31st, 2003 09:17 am (UTC)
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Coming from a Mormon background I think I can speak with some authority about Patriarhcal insulated Cults and the long term effects that being part of them have on the human mind. One thing I have seen happen is that although a person leaves the religion and denounces their faith, they carry that evangelistic zeal with them into the next phase of their lives. This can help explain why some Ex- Christians / Mormons whatever, become not only huge advocates for their new beliefs but they practice and propagate these beliefs with the same diligence that they were trying to escape when leaving their religion. It is as if their wiring is the same but just the outlet has changed.

My focus when I finally chose to leave Mormonism was to change that wiring and give up the need to preach and change others by word deed or action. This is why you won't see me get into any serious political or religious debate and truly, I try to listen and respect all sides of an issue. I have been called an "Independent' but even that affiliation to a party bothers me. I don't like to be pigeon holed. I spent my childhood trapped by the confines of that in religious form.

It saddens me now, how political and religious differences over the war or just in general are tearing people apart and forcing them to draw lines and to defend what ever 'party' they believe in's point of view. Nietzsche said something that illustrates this point more eloquently than I can:

"The first opinion that occurs to us when we are suddenly asked about anything is not usually our own, but only the current opinion belonging to our caste, position, or family; our own opinions seldom float on the surface."

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Mar. 31st, 2003 10:30 am (UTC)
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There was a book published a while ago called "How we believe?", a social scientists inquiry into the nature of peoples religious beliefs. One of the interesting conclusions was that the intensity of belief did seem to be inherited. If someone turned athiest after being strongly religious, they tended to be just as intense about their atheism.

And I've noticed my own tendency toward fanaticism, and try to stay somewhat quiet about it. (Though that can be challenging.)

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Melody

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from: melodymuse
date: Mar. 31st, 2003 04:57 pm (UTC)
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That sounds like a great book. I am really interested in people and their nature.

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