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Jan. 31st, 2003 | 10:36 am

I was trying to convert the noun "dyke" into an adjective. I can say the word and trying to spell it phonetically it comes out like "dyke-ie". though that's not right, any suggestions? Dykie, dykee, dykey? (or even better is there a grammatical rule covering this case?)

Also while checking to see of the OED had any useful suggestions I learned that there once was a phrase "dike-hopper" to refer to people crossing fences. Aparently a figurative usage formed to refer to someone who was "a transgresser of the laws of morality".

I wonder if that's how it became to be applied to queer women?

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Comments {8}

Life Rebooted

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from: hopeforyou
date: Jan. 31st, 2003 10:51 am (UTC)
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How about "dykish", as in, "She was a dykish girl", or "She had a dykish manner about her"?

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Jan. 31st, 2003 02:53 pm (UTC)
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That was how I ended up constructing the sentance, though since I've heard people say dyky, I was wondering how it was spelled.

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her other side

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from: saltbox
date: Jan. 31st, 2003 11:52 am (UTC)
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As you can see here, answering such questions seems to be in the area of serious linguistic analysis.

I'd always assumed it was dykey, but now that I think about it, and try to analogize to other words, perhaps it should be dyky---like flake -> flaky and snake -> snaky.

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Diane Trout

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from: alienghic
date: Jan. 31st, 2003 02:57 pm (UTC)
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thanks for the paper reference...

I think I like your system of analogy to define the word, "dyky" it is, (Though it hurts because the y is prounced two different ways in the same word.)

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her other side

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from: saltbox
date: Jan. 31st, 2003 03:07 pm (UTC)
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Oh, and hey. Here's a website that goes into various word origins. The last entry on the "D" page examines the origins of the word dyke.

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Josh

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from: irilyth
date: Jan. 31st, 2003 12:03 pm (UTC)
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I like dykish, for what it's worth.

I've also heard the dike-hopper explanation, but don't know if it's accurate or urban legend.

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Nafees

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from: nogbogfrog
date: Feb. 2nd, 2003 01:46 pm (UTC)
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"What is a protective dike? Is it a woman standing by the river going < Deep Voice > "Don't go near there!" "But Betty!" "Don't go near there... Get away from the river! Stay away from there!"
...
"It's women in comfortable shoes"

Robin Williams
(Good Morning Vietnam)

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dikehopper

from: f_flyer
date: Mar. 17th, 2009 04:17 pm (UTC)
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Here its a reference to Dutch heritage. Dikehopper is to Dutch person as Polack is to Polish person.

Its not derogatory.

Can't think of something for the "dike" adjective. We call female gays "dykes" here only if they are masculine-looking or masculine-behaving. Its nicer that "bulldyke" or "bull dyke" which was the 1950s-1960s way of describing a mannish female. Now THAT was a derogatory word.

Not really sure how this website works.

Rod
rod.clark@ic.gc.ca

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