?

Log in

No account? Create an account

no logo

« previous entry | next entry »
Jan. 13th, 2003 | 09:11 pm

I've spent the day resting from a mild illness and reading No Logo.

I feel like a dirty hypocritical socialist/anarchist. Though I'm aware of the abuses of the poor by the rich, I have to come to the conclusion that I am firmly in the upper class, probably with pleanty of explotition to be found in my clothes and electronics

No Logo is claiming the average service sector worker is making in the neighborhood of $10,000/ year, in the US (at least when the book was published). (The workers, or was that slaves, in third world countries making the junk to be sold at these stores are probably making between 1 and 2 dollars per day. (13 cents per hour was quoted for china, typically for 14 hours per day.)

I think one of the things that can be done to deal with the abuses of power by global capitalism is land reform. If it's easier for people in the countries exploited by global capital to own land, it's easier for them to walk away from jobs that pass out amphetemenes to keep workers going for that 48 hour day.

By making it harder to find workers, that should help drive wages up some.

I also realized that several brands have eaten their way into my consciousness. Ikea is a big one, Apple has recently tried winning me over, REI had been doing quite well. I wonder if CLIF's Luna bar counts as a lifestyle corporation yet.

Also I feel dirty for using mac os x instead of one of the revolution OSes, linux, *BSD, hurd

I hope my package from the EFF shows up soon. I'd like to hide the glowing apple logo with something more meaningful. (Though perhaps a share the road sticker would be "less offensive".

Link | Leave a comment | Share

Comments {8}

wig

(no subject)

from: wig
date: Jan. 13th, 2003 10:51 pm (UTC)
Link

This is the only 'political' book I have read from cover to cover. Most political writing bores me.

I know what you mean about feeling hypocritical, but I think we have to decide what compromises we are willing to make. Some people can live completely out of the system, back to the land, etc. which I think is great, but I don't think we should have to make huge sacrifices in order to live according to our consciences.

I try to focus on the positive things I'm doing because it's easy to get overwhelmed by it all, which I think can be counterproductive. Sure people can point out where I'm being hypocritical, but I think their criticism would probably be better directed elsewhere, as at least I am trying to move in the right direction.

Um... and yes I am going to have a go at linux this year :) Even though I know very little about computing.

Reply | Thread

Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Jan. 14th, 2003 01:09 am (UTC)
Link

Some other semi-political books I enjoyed were the post-corporate world by David Korten and the overspent american by Juliet Schore, and can't buy my love by Jean Killborne. (Though they're all about the related concepts of corporations manipulating our culture in different ways.

I'd agree that we shouldn't have to make huge sacrifices to live our conscious. Though sometimes it feels like we do.

Though one of my assumptions is that the first people starting to follow a new cultural pattern have the hardest time, but as more join it becomes increasingly easy.

For instance vegetarianism started out pretty obscure choice, and now major US grocery stores are carrying vegetarian prepackaged food.

I came from a fundamentalist fanatic religious background which seems to have set me up for the idea of "salvation through deprivation".

So I've been using free software/open source software for quite some time. And in the beginning it could be annoying, but by participating in the community it felt like I could make it easier for those coming in later

BTW, If you're thinking of trying linux, could I ask what you usually use a computer for? (For instance if it's doing lots of presentations linux isn't all that good yet. if it's basic word processing there's pretty decent free software, if it's doing intenet related stuff, the software is usually superior to the commercial offerings.)

Reply | Parent | Thread

Vicky the Compost Queen

You might enjoy this book

from: vixter
date: Jan. 14th, 2003 02:24 pm (UTC)
Link

Though one of my assumptions is that the first people starting to follow a new cultural pattern have the hardest time, but as more join it becomes increasingly easy.

This is similar to one of the premises of the book The Tipping Point by Malcom Gladwell. He discusses some of the mechanisms of how this happens. Also he discusses how behavior can be modified by environment.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Diane Trout

Re: You might enjoy this book

from: alienghic
date: Jan. 17th, 2003 01:35 am (UTC)
Link

That does sound like an interesting book...

Reply | Parent | Thread

wig

(no subject)

from: wig
date: Jan. 14th, 2003 10:07 pm (UTC)
Link

Though one of my assumptions is that the first people starting to follow a new cultural pattern have the hardest time, but as more join it becomes increasingly easy.

This is a really good point.

And different things are easier for different people. For example, I do not feel like it is a hardship to live without owning a car.

I do use the computer mostly for word processing and internet. Unfortunately we will have to keep Windows on as well since my hubby needs it for work. There is someone who lives near me who seems to know a lot about linux and has offered to help me when I install it.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Diane Trout

(no subject)

from: alienghic
date: Jan. 17th, 2003 01:32 am (UTC)
Link

Not owning a car is quite the challenging pattern. Many people have trouble even conceiving of life without a car. Even with everything I know about cars I still end up using one, mostly since I don't want to do the 14 mile bike home from one of my friends houses at 3am.

Reply | Parent | Thread

Land Reform

from: anonymous
date: Jan. 15th, 2003 10:25 pm (UTC)
Link

[i]I think one of the things that can be done to deal with the abuses of power by global capitalism is land reform. If it's easier for people in the countries exploited by global capital to own land, it's easier for them to walk away from jobs that pass out amphetemenes to keep workers going for that 48 hour day.By making it harder to find workers, that should help drive wages up some.[/i]

Bad news - China is one of those countries that you are upset about, where cheap labor makes ther things you buy. China also is one of the leading nations in the area of "land reform". All of those cheap labor folks own a portion of the land (the same size portion, in fact). They all have a plot of land to farm for themselves. It doesn't help with their need for a job though.

Reply | Thread

Diane Trout

Re: Land Reform

from: alienghic
date: Jan. 17th, 2003 01:30 am (UTC)
Link

Okay, you do have a valid point, being able to be independent from a crummy exploitive job cannot be done purely through land reform. You also need access to the knowledge needed to produce food on it, access to water, seeds, etc. Also one needs to live somewhere where the state doesn't actually engage in the exploitation.

Though the comment came from reading No Logo where some of the workers she was refering to mentioned that they couldn't leave the export processing zone because their families had lost their land (I think that was the quote, I don't quite remember why they didn't have access to land, but they certainly were claiming that they didn't.)

Reply | Parent | Thread